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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
for an extended period. >> tom: but ben bernanke tells lawmakers he's moving ahead with plans to pull some of the rescue programs put in place during the financial crisis. you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, february 24. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> susie: good evening, everyone. your interest rates won't be going up for a little while longer. federal reserve chairman ben bernanke told congress today he does not plan to raise rates anytime soon. >> tom: susie, those were magical words for investors. stocks rallied with the dow gaining 91 points. >> susie: tom, bernanke also told lawmakers about the fed's plans to wind down the emergency lending programs put in place during the financial crisis. darren gersh has details, and how the transition back to normal could impact you. >> reporter: when you've pumped more than a trillion dollars into the financial system, as the federal reser
captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: bernanke's blueprint, the federal reserve chairman outlines plans to pull back the trillions of dollars the central bank has used to prop up the economy. >> suzanne: the exit strategy includes eventually removing cash from the financial system, then raising interest rates. you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, february 10. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, everyone. a huge winter storm closed the federal government again today. that didn't stop federal reserve chairman ben bernanke from making news. >> the weather postponed the hearing. >> tom: the central bank oh could take to prop up the economy. erika miller has the details. >> reporter: investors did not hear the fed chairman's testimony today, but they still could read it. all 3,496 words. economists say the most important sentence is here, on page ten. "the federal re
investigation. and fed chairman ben bernanke told lawmakers at a senate banking hearing today that he's reviewing goldman's derivative swaps with greece. >> obviously, using these instruments in a way that intentionally destabilizes a company or a country is... is counterproductive, and i'm sure the s.e.c will be looking into that. we'll certainly be evaluating what we can learn from the activities of the holding companies that we supervise here in the u.s. >> susie: at that same hearing today, bernanke repeated the same message he told house lawmakers yesterday-- he does not plan to raise interest rates anytime soon. so, if interest rates remain at historically low levels for many more months, what does that mean for stock investors? suzanne pratt asked some market pros for their opinion on that topic. >> reporter: when federal reserve chairman ben bernanke talks, wall street always pays close attention. that's because there's an inverse relationship between fed policy and stock prices. tighter money usually means stocks move lower, while easy money generally equals higher stock pric
a year. we'll have full details in tonight's "market focus". as ben bernanke was sworn in for a second term today, the federal reserve chairman said he was focused on protecting the agency's independence. bernanke said that independence is key to keeping monetary policy focused on the long-term interests of the american people, and not political whims. >> susie: you've probably noticed that the prices you're paying at the pump are holding steady these days. but can we count on them to stay that way? well, that all depends on what happens to the price of oil. and, as suzanne pratt reports, forecasts for oil prices in 2010 are all over the map. >> reporter: at this gas station in midtown manhattan, gas prices are among the highest in the nation. whether they spike even higher, head lower, or stay in the same range this year depends on who you ask. j.p. morgan's lawrence eagles expects crude prices, which dictate gas prices, to climb higher. that's after averaging between $72 and $76 a barrel in the first half this year. >> moving higher in the second half, up to $88 by the end of the yea
" lending now that financial market conditions are improving. >> tom: so what are ben bernanke and company thinking? where does the fed go from here? and what does it mean for the cost of credit? we get some insight from a fed watcher and a market pro. you're watching "nightly business report" for thursday, february 18. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> susie: good evening, everyone. the federal reserve took the first step today to bring the banking system back to normal. right after the market close, the fed announced it's raising the interest rate it charges banks by a quarter of a percentage point. >> tom: susie, the so-called "discount rate" is used by banks for emergency loans, and was cut drastically during the financial crisis. the fed raised that rate today, saying in a statement it's time to "normalize" lending now that financial market conditions are improving. >> susie: tom, the fed's move sounds
. ben bernanke and company were feeling more upbeat about the recovery at last month's fed interest rate meeting. in minutes from the late january meeting, policymakers agreed on the need to eventually raise rates, but they differed on when to start. meanwhile, the treasury says more americans are benefiting from the administration's foreclosure prevention plan. through january, almost a million homeowners had their mortgage payments cut, but those trial loan modifications have only been made permanent in 116,000 cases. walgreen's will soon be the corner drug store in new york city. it's buying duane reade for $618 million. the deal makes walgreen's the city, and the nation's, largest drug store. >> susie: the recovery in the hotel business has a long way to go, and 2010 will be another tough year. so says the man who runs intercontinental hotels, and the holiday inn and crown plaza chains. his cautious outlook comes a day after the intercontinental hotel group reported a 34% drop in quarterly profits. joining us now, andy cosslett, intercontinental's c.e.o. >> welcome to "nightly busin
garzarelli, president of garzarelli capital. wednesday, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke testifies on capitol hill about the state of the economy. and monday, we charge ahead with new credit card rules. they go into effect that day, so we look at how they'll affect the bottom line of banks. >> susie: profitability was not a safe bet for nevada casinos last year. casinos posted their biggest- losses ever. the state's gaming board says the industry lost nearly $7 billion in fiscal 2009. more than half of that-- $4 billion-- was in properties along the las vegas strip. the only bright spot, from a financial standpoint: people drank more! alcohol sales rose 2%, while revenue tied to casinos, rooms and food, all dropped. >> tom: a month after toyota's massive gas pedal recall announcement and we're learning just how busy some auto repair shops have been. two large toyota dealers, auto nation and penske auto group have fixed more than 17,000 toyotas each. penske says the accelerator problems cost $70 to fix. that's the cost to toyota. so based on penske's assessment, toyota may spend up
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)